Go to content, skip over navigation

Sections

More Pages

Go to content, skip over visible header bar
Home News Features Arts & Entertainment Sports OpinionAbout Contact Advertise

Note about Unsupported Devices:

You seem to be browsing on a screen size, browser, or device that this website cannot support. Some things might look and act a little weird.

News

Activist and educator DeRay McKesson ’07 publishes book

On Tuesday, Viking Books released “On the Other Side of Hope: The Case for Freedom,” a collection of essays written by educator and civil rights activist DeRay McKesson ’07. The Baltimore native’s debut presents his experiences and memories alongside his suggestions for addressing a range of social problems.

Read more

Academic

New director looks to refresh CPC

Over the summer, the Career Planning Center (CPC) found itself in a new space with new leadership. Since beginning her position in July, the new Director of Career Planning Kristin Brennan has set new targets and reestablished old goals in an effort to make the CPC accessible to more students, alumni and parents.

Read more

Frustrations persist after pay raise for hourly employees

As Bowdoin students and faculty returned to Brunswick for the fall semester, they took in scenes typical of late summer at Bowdoin: well-manicured lawns, stately buildings, lobster for dinner and a welcome back message from President Clayton Rose, which this year included a note about pay for hourly employees.

Read more

Labor shortage delays Roux completion

Several weeks ago, upon moving into the Roux Center for the Environment, professors were asked to don hard hats as they carted books and furniture into new offices. Originally scheduled to be complete before classes started, the building remains unfinished, with tarps covering a large portion of the building and pipes exposed in several classrooms.

Read more

Student Government

Impeachment thwarted at BSG

After an election marred with misunderstandings and an inconsistent enforcement of rules, Aneka Kazlyna ’20, multicultural representative to Bowdoin Student Government (BSG), introduced articles of impeachment against two members of BSG on Wednesday night for actions that occurred during the BSG chairs election.

Read more

Admissions

Over 500 commit to Class of 2022

As of the May 1 commitment date, 525 students have submitted a deposit to Bowdoin for the Class of 2022. Following the College’s most selective admissions season yet, this number is greater than the class of 500 students that Bowdoin planned would matriculate in August 2018, according to Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Whitney Soule.

Read more

Ivies

One transport during Ivies

With a few exceptions, students celebrated this year’s Ivies Weekend responsibly, according to the Director of Safety and Security Randy Nichols. There were multiple incidences throughout the weekend that required Bowdoin Security to intervene, but none involved the Brunswick Police Department (BPD).

Read more

Student Government

Rule violations mar election for BSG chairs

Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) canceled and then re-held its election for six Executive Team positions this week after concerns about possible violations of election rules. After a meeting of the Election Commission, Nora Cullen ’18 and Justin Weathers ’18, chair and vice chair of the Judicial Board, respectively, presided over the new election independently of the BSG Executive Team.

Read more

Academic Affairs

Psych department struggles to meet demand

During Round 1 of course selection for the fall 2018 semester, there were 62 requests for 35 spots in Abnormal Psychology, reflecting a strong student interest in clinical psychology and an under-resourced department, according to Samuel Putnam, professor of psychology and chair of the department.

Read more

College to open testing center for accommodations

Bowdoin will hire an additional employee who will be fully devoted to accommodating students with disabilities who will start next year, pending Trustees’ approval of the budget this May. Additionally, the College will create a testing center in Hawthorne-Longfellow Library where students who receive academic accommodations such as extra time will be able to take exams.

Read more

Academic Affairs

Professors propose urban studies minor

A group of professors has submitted a proposal for a new urban studies minor as result of growing interest in the topic amongst students and faculty. Though this is not the first time an urban studies minor or major has been proposed, faculty believe that there are now enough courses, drawing from various departments and areas of study, to sustain a minor.

Read more

College announces carbon neutrality

On Thursday, President Clayton Rose announced that the College has achieved its goal of being carbon neutral by 2020 two years earlier than expected, after years of planning and implementing energy-saving measures across campus and beyond.

Read more

Student Government

Mohamed Nur and Amber Rock win BSG election

Mohamed Nur ’19 will be the Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) president during the 2018-2019 academic year and Amber Rock ’19 will be BSG vice president for student government affairs. The results of this weekend’s election were announced in an email to the Orient Sunday night from BSG President, Irfan Alam ’18.

Read more

Admissions

Dept. of Justice investigates Bowdoin’s early admission practices

The Department of Justice (DOJ) is investigating Bowdoin and at least eight other colleges and universities regarding potential violations of antitrust law in their early admissions processes. The investigation concerns the behind-the-scenes exchange of information between colleges about their admitted early decision (ED) applicants, a practice intended to ensure prospective students have not submitted binding applications to multiple schools.

Read more

College invites 21 students to join Geoffrey Canada Scholars Program

A cohort of Bowdoin students from the Class of 2022 will arrive on campus six weeks before the start of the fall semester as part of the recently-announced Geoffrey Canada Scholars Program. The program, named after the educator and activist, is part of the College’s THRIVE initiative, which aims to better support low-income, first generation and underrepresented students.

Read more

Chemistry fund honors former professor Dana W. Mayo

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus Dana W. Mayo, who passed away in November 2016 at the age of 88, played a pivotal role in the growth of the College’s chemistry department. With the support of his family, former students and the College, “Doc Mayo,” as he was known by his students, was honored this week through the creation the Dana Walker Mayo Fund.

Read more

Events

Students, community share different perspectives on guns

Bowdoin students and Brunswick residents gathered in Morrell Lounge on Wednesday night to share their perspectives on gun rights and gun control. The conversation was part of the What Matters series, organized by the Joseph McKeen Center for the Common Good and Makeshift Coffee House, an organization that facilitates open conversations about various topics all around Maine.

Read more

Asian Heritage Month

Asian Heritage Month spreads cultural awareness

This month, Bowdoin’s Asian Students Alliance (ASA) will host Asian Heritage Month, an opportunity to reflect on and discuss the importance of Asian and Asian American identities and to celebrate their diversity. Inspired by the nationwide observance of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, which commemorates important dates such as the first arrivals of Japanese immigrants and the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad, Bowdoin’s Asian Heritage Month will include discussions with artists, media icons and other prominent figures in the Asian American and wider Asian community.

Read more

Events

Peter Skerry on immigration: ‘It’s not about your grandmother’

Yesterday afternoon, Peter Skerry, a professor of political science at Boston College and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, shared his views on immigration policy in a talk titled “It’s Not About Your Grandmother! Some Dispassionate Reflections on Immigration.” Drawing on trends and attitudes towards immigration to the United States the past three decades, Skerry aimed to point out flaws in both the left’s and right’s dominant narratives on immigration.

Read more

Events

Roxane Gay talks #metoo, Black Panther and imperfection

In the introduction to her book “Bad Feminist,” Roxane Gay accepts the moniker because she is “flawed and human,” but that she feels a responsibility to raise her voice “to show all the ways we have room to want more, to do better.” At Gay’s Monday night talk, the Bowdoin community proved anxious to listen to that voice.

Read more

Safe Space introduces hotline for survivors of sexual assault

Safe Space launched a support line for students who have experienced sexual harassment or sexual assault on Wednesday. Student representatives of Safe Space, previously accessible via their mailboxes, emails or social media, will now be on-call every night of the week, including later hours on weekends, to provide confidential assistance and support.

Read more

News in Brief

Orient named best college newspaper in New England

The Orient was named the 2018 College Newspaper of the Year by the New England Society of News Editors (NESNE) and the New England Newspaper and Press Association (NENPA) in an announcement on Wednesday. In an email to the Orient, Sydney Conway of NENPA, wrote “It is clear that in the past year you have produced great material, and that lots of hard work has been put in by the newspaper’s staff.” The editors of the Orient will travel to a reception at the Boston Globe on April 19 where all NENPA AND NESNE honors will be presented, joining editors and reporters from news outlets across New England.

Read more

News in Brief

Council approves second phase of Whittier Field plan

The Brunswick Town Council formally approved the second phase of Bowdoin’s plans to renovate Whittier Field, the Forecaster reported yesterday. The project includes building a new road to connect Pine Street and Bath Road. The decision this Tuesday followed a vote in December to allow the College to discontinue Pine Street in order to build new athletic facilities alongside Whittier Field.

Read more

D.R.A.M., AJR to headline Ivies

Rapper D.R.A.M. and indie-pop band AJR will headline this year’s Ivies weekend, the Entertainment Board (E-Board) announced last night at a silent disco in Jack Magee’s Pub and Grill. D.R.A.M., who will be performing in Farley Field House on Saturday, April 28, is best known for the song “Broccoli,” which features Lil Yachty.

Read more

Security Report

Security Report, 3/19 to 3/29

Monday, March 19 An employee at the Hawthorne-Longfellow Library was reported to be choking on an object that was stuck in her throat. A security officer performed the Heimlich maneuver and dislodged the obstruction. Tuesday, March 20 A local man was asked to leave campus after he was observed doing skateboarding tricks on the flagpole memorial near Gibson Hall.

Read more

Student Life

New apartments announced, to be completed for fall 2019

The College plans to introduce two new upperclass student living spaces in fall 2019—four suite-style apartment houses as well as the conversion of Boody-Johnson House into a College House. Born out of more than 1,600 survey responses from students, faculty, staff and neighbors as well as the efforts of a working group on off-campus and upperclass housing, these two changes to Bowdoin’s campus work to address student desires and entice students to remain living on campus.

Read more

Events

Jose Antonio Vargas discusses immigration, discomfort and finding home

Jose Antonio Vargas is home. His California driver’s license may look a little different than a citizen’s, but—in front of a packed Kresge Auditorium last night for the Kenneth V. Santagata Memorial Lecture—he shared his personal struggle to feel like he belongs in America as an undocumented immigrant, and he challenged Bowdoin students to undertake the uncomfortable conversations necessary in today’s immigration debate.

Read more

Safety and Security

In wake of Parkland, College to hold first-ever lockdown drill

Sometime on the week of March 5, the Office of Safety and Security will hold its first ever on-campus lockdown drill, during which all campus buildings will be locked and inaccessible with OneCards. Although this drill comes shortly after a shooter killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Associate Director of Safety and Security Dave Profit said that this drill has been planned for months and was not influenced by the event.

Read more

Academic Affairs

Roux Center progressing on schedule

The Roux Center for the Environment is on track for its scheduled opening next fall, according to Matt Orlando, senior vice president for finance and administration and treasurer of the College. With a $16.5 million budget—$10 million of which was a gift by David and Barbara Roux P’14—the 29,000 square-foot, three-storied building will have four labs dedicated to student coursework, two classrooms and a large flexible classroom space, as well as a variety of common areas.

Read more

Panel outlines student experiences with accomodations, disability

Amid ongoing efforts to improve Bowdoin’s handling of accommodations and disability, students, faculty and staff convened in Lancaster Lounge this week to hear four student panelists speak about their experiences navigating accessibility at Bowdoin, particularly accessibility in academics, and potential steps toward creating a more accessible campus.

Read more

Students, professors to explore disagreement and political polarization in the digital age

In an upcoming panel on intellectual engagement in conversations across political differences, Bowdoin students and professors—representing a variety of political perspectives themselves—will try to tackle the question of how to address disagreement. “The Art of Disagreement in an Age of Outrage,” moderated by Noah Finberg ’16, will take place this Monday in Morrell Lounge from 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Read more

Brunswick

Four students issued summonses in two weeks, Nichols says BPD sending ‘message of caution’

Four students have received court summons in the past two weeks for charges of jaywalking and possession of liquor by a minor. One of those summons resulted after the Brunswick Police Department (BPD) showed up at the annual Cold War party at MacMillan and Quinby Houses last weekend, while the remaining three were issued the previous weekend.

Read more

Over 80 women to put on RISE reprise

  Over 80 women will perform in the College’s second annual production of “RISE: Untold Stories of Bowdoin Women” today and Saturday in Kresge Auditorium, following last night’s debut performance. The show, built around Bowdoin students’ stories about relationships, hookups and other gendered experiences, replaced the production of “The Vagina Monologues,” seeking more intersectionality and stories that better represented the real experiences of Bowdoin women.

Read more

Activism

‘How to be a better environmentalist’: professors, community activists weigh in

Students, faculty, staff and community members packed the Shannon Room last night to consider what types of environmental activism are most effective. The panel, titled “Consumerism, Activism, and Individualism: How to be a Better Environmentalist,” was planned by Lauren Hickey ’20 over the course of several months on behalf of the Office of Sustainability.

Read more

News in Brief

Bowdoin tops Fulbright list, maintains high success ratio

Half of Bowdoin students who applied for Fulbright awards for the 2017-2018 academic received them, the best ratio among any of the nation’s top undergraduate Fulbright Student producers, according to the Fulbright Program. Forty Bowdoin students applied for Fulbrights last year, and 20 received them, the most from Bowdoin since data became available a decade ago.

Read more

Stolen paychecks prompt push for two-step login on Workday

After nearly 20 college students employees, faculty and staff saw their paychecks stolen since the College began using Workday to manage employee finances and payments in January 2016, Bowdoin Information Technology (IT) rolled out a two-step authentication, which became mandatory on Tuesday.

Read more

News in Brief

Mckesson ’07 lands book deal

Civil rights activist and educator DeRay Mckesson ’07 announced on Wednesday that he has signed his first book deal with Viking Books. His book, “On the Other Side of Freedom: The Case for Hope” will be released on September 4.

Read more

News in Brief

In series of moves, GSWS to leave Boody-Johnson

Correction: In our desire to break this story, an earlier version of this article jumped to the conclusion that Boody-Johnson House was to become student housing next year. In an email to the Orient, Dean of Students Tim Foster said the administration was only exploring the possibility of the house being converted into student housing, timeframe unknown, and confirmed that if this transition were to happen, it would not be next year. 

Read more

Black History At Bowdoin

MLK to #MeToo: Michael Eric Dyson talks, raps and inspires conversation on race

Prolific author and sociologist, Baptist minister, rap and pop culture connoisseur and dynamic storyteller, Dr. Michael Eric Dyson packed Kresge Auditorium on Tuesday to deliver the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture. Dyson’s talk, titled “MLK for the 21st Century,” set out to imagine King’s vision in the context of contemporary issues such as police violence, sexism, homophobia and patriarchal power, sexual violence and the #MeToo movement.

Read more

Over 60 students’ emails hacked since December

Since mid-December, more than 60 students’ email accounts have been hacked, resulting in a series of phishing attempts. Emails claiming association with Temple University and such fictional institutions as “Recruitment Team,” “Market Force Information” and “Mystery Shoppers” arrived in inboxes with promises of easy pay—provided that recipients enter sensitive personal information first.

Read more

College’s alumni donation rate among highest in country

The Senior Class Giving Campaign (SCGC) officially began at its launch event last Thursday with hopes of continuing the College’s tradition of strong alumni giving. SCGC has a two-fold purpose: to raise awareness about the importance of giving back to Bowdoin after graduation and to solicit donations from seniors this semester.

Read more

News in Brief

Facilities works to keep up with winter weather

As falling temperatures, rain and snow hit midcoast Maine this week—knocking out parts of campus power on Wednesday—Facilities staff got to work extra early to clear ice from the College’s streets and paths. Over the course of Wednesday afternoon and evening, Brunswick received about seven inches of snow, according to the National Weather Service.

Read more

News in Brief

Senator Angus King wins fight for lobster emoji

Bowdoin students, and anyone with an iPhone or Android device, will soon be able to use a lobster emoji thanks to lobbying efforts from Senator Angus King H’07 (I-Maine). The Unicode Consortium, a Silicon Valley-based group of individuals and corporations that is responsible for designing emojis, unveiled the lobster along with 156 other new emojis on Wednesday.

Read more

News in Brief

Amtrak Downeaster may expand for the summer

The Amtrak Downeaster, which currently runs from Boston to Brunswick, could go as far north as Rockland this summer if the Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority (NNEPRA) approves a pilot program in March. NNERPA wants to ensure that Maine communities will be active Amtrak partners before it finalizes the service, the Maine Free Press reported last week.

Read more

Student Government

Rose seeks funding ideas at BSG meeting

On Wednesday, President Clayton Rose attended the Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) meeting to solicit student opinions on future use of the College’s funding. This funding comes primarily from donors and investments. According to Rose, Bowdoin has the second highest alumni donation participation rate in the nation.

Read more

Board of Trustees

Trustee meeting to take place in Palo Alto

The second meeting of the Board of Trustees this academic year will be held in Palo Alto, California beginning next Thursday. It is the first time the meeting will be held outside of the Northeast. “We wanted to engage with the culture of the ‘new economy’—not that new anymore—the culture of technology and innovation and entrepreneurship,” said President Clayton Rose.

Read more

Administration

Dean’s office formalizes emergency aid

The College has created an online form for students to apply for emergency financial aid, Dean of Students Janet Lohmann announced in an email to the student body last Friday. The fund—which will cover the costs of “emergencies, special programs, test prep, supplies, travel and unanticipated events,” according to the website—is composed of donations from the Bowdoin community.

Read more

Student Life

Campus braces for influenza season

Bowdoin has already seen some effects of the influenza epidemic, characterized by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as moderately severe this year. According to Director of Health Services Dr. Jeffrey Maher, the bulk of the cases will present in the coming months.

Read more

College Houses

Ladd House to be seniors-only next year as students seek upperclass spaces

Ladd House, one of the eight College Houses on campus, will be senior-only housing next year if enough rising seniors apply next week. The decision to convert the House, traditionally occupied by sophomores, into senior housing was proposed by a group of juniors, and occurred amid numerous conversations about how to make College housing more appealing to upperclassmen.

Read more

Student Government

BSG talks counseling, new constitution

At its first meeting of the semester on Wednesday, Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) discussed revising its constitution and improving student counseling resources. BSG hopes to pass a new constitution before spring break, which would require one third of the student body to vote on the constitution and two thirds of those votes to be in favor.

Read more

News in Brief

Intergroup dialogue program expands to discuss class

Twelve students will participate in a trial intergroup dialogue (IGD) curriculum on socioeconomic class beginning this February. Kate Stern and Leana Amaez, associate deans of students for diversity and inclusion and co-directors of the Center for Sexuality, Women & Gender will facilitate discussion with students from various class backgrounds.

Read more