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News

Events

‘Under Fire’ in a ‘more perfect union’: April Ryan talks White House reporting

When she took to the stage in Kresge Auditorium on Tuesday night, April Ryan faced a nicer crowd than she’s encountered at the White House lately. In front of a packed audience of students and community members in Kresge Auditorium, Ryan spoke about her experience covering the White House and the long quest for a “more perfect union.” The event, sponsored by the African-American Society, was the the final program of Black History Month and Beyond and the first of Herstory, a celebration of Women’s History Month.

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BSG votes to adopt student-created voting software

On Wednesday, Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) representatives deliberated and voted on a new voting system. Out of the three choices—a student-created, computer-based system, paper ballots and software purchased from an external provider—the majority voted for buying student-created software.

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Bowdoin women of color collaborate on annual photoshoot and gallery

Last night, the exhibition “Beauty in Color” opened in the Lamarche Gallery in David Saul Smith Union. It featured photos that were taken on February 3 during Bowdoin’s second annual Women of Color Photoshoot, where 40 Bowdoin women of color (WOC), three organizers and general photographers gathered in room 601 of Memorial Hall.

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Bowdoin alum talks ‘hacking literature’

Weaving together literature, biotechnology, philosophy and political theory, Eileen Hunt Botting ’93 took to the podium in the Searles Science Building on Monday evening to deliver her lecture “Shelley, Hawthorne, and the Ethics of Genetic Engineering.” Addressing Bowdoin students, professors and community members in a packed lecture hall, Botting explored the ethical and political implications of advancements in biotechnology through a discussion of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein,” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Birth-Mark” and other works she calls “hacker literature” in a talk sponsored by the Peucinian Society.

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BCA thinks big picture with Sunrise alliance

For its next foray into climate activism, Bowdoin Climate Action (BCA)  is connecting with the Sunrise Movement, a national organization that advocates for political action on climate change. Sunrise has mostly recently been linked to activism surrounding the Green New Deal—not divestment campaigns, for which BCA had long been known.

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Brock Clarke delivers Greason inaugural lecture

Last night, Bowdoin students, faculty and community members huddled together in Kresge Auditorium to listen to Professor of English Brock Clarke’s inaugural lecture as the A. Leroy Greason Professor of English. Clarke’s talk, titled “What the Cold Can Teach Us,” focused less on inclement weather itself but instead on Clarke’s own experiences and obsessions and their influence on him as a writer.

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BSG votes to buy condoms and dental dams for upperclass residences

In an almost-unanimous vote, Bowdoin Student Government’s (BSG) General Assembly voted to purchase $500 worth of condoms and dental dams for upperclassmen housing. The initiative, which was introduced for the second year in a row, was proposed by Tessa DeFranco ’21 to address a lack of access to contraceptives and sexual protection in many residential areas.

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Fire causes more than $10,000 in damage

Students were evacuated from Quinby House Monday morning after a fire broke out in a student bedroom. Tristan Young ’21, the resident of the room, was taken to the Maine Medical Center for treatment for second- and third-degree burns on his right hand, but has since been released.

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Career Planning refocuses on practical skills, internships

Helping students develop practical skills is the focus of the newest initiative from the Career Planning Center (CPC). The renewed push comes on the heels of a report released by President Clayton Rose last fall, which found that students felt they lacked important professional skills such as personal finance and public speaking.

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Oren Cass addresses the future of the economy

What if the dominant paradigm of economic thinking in the United States is wrong? On Tuesday evening, in his talk titled “The Once and Future Worker: How Consumerist Consensus Led America Astray and How to Recover,” Oren Cass, senior fellow for policy research at the Manhattan Institute, outlined his vision for an economy that would take into account the interests of workers.

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Affinity groups band together for Blind Date Dinner

Last night, African American Society (AfAm), Latin American Student Organization (LASO) and Asian Student Alliance (ASA) joined together to put on the third annual Valentine’s Day Blind Date Dinner. The central goal of the program was to bring as many people together—breaking outside of their own Bowdoin bubbles—as possible, said Louis Mendez ’19, president of LASO.

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Inaugural lecture discusses steadying institutions through times of turmoil

Bowdoin students and community members gathered in Kresge on Monday for Professor Allen Springer’s inaugural lecture as the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Constitutional and International Law and Government. Speaking to a rapt audience, Springer stressed the importance of valuing international laws and institutions in his lecture, titled “Institutional Resilience in Turbulent Times.” “The question of how international institutions evolve, even survive in a changing world seems particularly relevant today,” Springer said in the opening of his lecture.

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Bowdoin among top Fulbright producers, again

Bowdoin was again lauded as one of the top Fulbright-producing institutions for the 2018-2019 academic year, with 19 students receiving Fulbright Student grants. Among Bachelor’s institutions, only Williams had more awardees, with 22. Thirty-seven Bowdoin students had applied for Fulbright awards, yielding a 51 percent success rate.

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Annual winter flu outbreak sweeps across Bowdoin’s campus

Over the last few weeks, providers at Health Services have treated hundreds of students with flu-like symptoms. This noticeable uptick in flu cases would be unusual at most other points in the academic year, but according to Jeffrey Maher, director of health services, an increase in flu cases immediately after Winter Break is an annual occurrence.

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First-gen alumnus elected trustee chair

Robert F. White ’77 P’15 has been elected unanimously to serve as the chair of Bowdoin’s Board of Trustees. His term will begin on July 1, 2019. White succeeds Michele G. Cyr ’76 P’12 who served as chair for three years and will continue to serve on the Board.

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Women’s stories take center stage

Stories of friendship, trauma and political activism share the stage this weekend at the third annual production of “RISE: Untold Stories of Bowdoin Women.” This year’s show, true to its roots, represents diverse experiences of Bowdoin women, even when they may be difficult to hear.

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Five decades of the environment at Bowdoin

In April of last year, the College announced its achievement of carbon neutrality, two years ahead of schedule. The notice came after a decade of infrastructural overhauls—a cogenerations turbine, oil to natural gas conversion, the installation of thousands of LED lights and, finally, the purchase of renewable energy credits.

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Lecturer analyzes premodern reproductive health

On Monday afternoon, Leslie Tuttle, associate professor of history from Louisiana State University, began a talk to a packed audience in the Beam Classroom by describing the “suspicious death” of Mademoiselle de Guerchy, a tabloid star of Louis XIV’s Paris.

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Disparities exist in CPC programming

The Orient’s midyear approval ratings showed that the senior class is overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the Career Planning Center (CPC)—but further investigation has shown that approval varies widely by industry, with students looking to enter consulting and technology generally expressing positive sentiments while students in arts and communications are the least happy.

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Political donations from faculty and staff increase, stay left in midterm cycle

Political donations by Bowdoin faculty and staff surged during the 2018 midterm cycle and universally supported liberal causes, according to an Orient analysis of data from the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). Donations made by members of the College’s Board of Trustees were varied between Democratic and Republican groups and candidates, but donations to liberal causes far outnumbered donations to conservative causes.

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Bowdoin kicks off Black History Month and Beyond

A Pulitzer Prize winning author and a White House correspondent will be among the guests on campus for Black History Month and Beyond this year. The celebration, led by several affinity groups, will officially commence today during the Kick-Off Reception in Russwurm African American Center from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

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BSG seeks input on double minors, exam policy

Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) sent out a survey to gauge student opinion of two widely-contested academic policies last week with the hopes of garnering momentum to convince faculty to change the policies. The first of these policies, known as the “bunching rule,” states that students with three final exams in a 48-hour period can reschedule one to a more convenient time; the second policy prevents students from declaring two minors.

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Partial government shutdown affects science research

As the government shutdown drags on for more than a month, it has begun to affect scientific research on campus, already forcing some faculty and students to adjust their plans. “The shutdown has definitely affected my ability to do collaborative projects,” said Patsy Dickinson, Josiah Little professor of natural sciences.

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Jonathan R. Farmer ’03 among Americans killed in Syria

Bowdoin graduate and U.S. Army Green Beret Jonathan R. Farmer ’03 was killed in action in Syria on January 16 along with three other Americans. He was 37 years old. The Islamic State took credit for the attack in the northern city of Manbij, which killed 19 people in total after a suicide bomber detonated an explosive vest inside a restaurant.

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College offers first annual MLK day programming

For the first time when the holiday fell during the semester, the College did not hold classes on Martin Luther King Day. In lieu of beginning the semester on Monday, students were encouraged to participate in programming that focused on the life and legacy of Dr.

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Midyear approval ratings

This past week, the Orient sent out its semesterly approval ratings survey. The survey was sent to all 1,805 students and yielded 475 responses (26.3 percent). Support for the Brunswick Police Department declined sharply from last year amid controversy over off-campus enforcement.

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First year dies in car crash

Henry Zietlow ’22, from St. Paul, Minnesota, died in a car crash in Wisconsin on Monday. According to a release from the Wisconsin State Patrol, Zietlow and his mother were headed north on Highway 63 near the town of Hayward when a southbound pickup truck lost control and crossed into the northbound lane, where it collided with their car.

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Politics becomes personal as students advocate for climate change policy in D.C.

Politics doesn’t always happen during an optimal time—a lesson Bowdoin students learned last Sunday as they headed to Washington D.C., two days before finals period began. Sixteen students joined 1,000 protesters in the nation’s capitol this weekend to sit-in and encourage House Representatives to support a resolution for a Select Committee for a Green New Deal proposed by newly elected U.S.

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Flying squirrels take up residence

The Northern flying squirrel can glide 135 feet through the air—and a few of these furry mammals have landed in Quinby House this fall. Jeff Tuttle, senior associate director for facilities operations and maintenance, says the squirrels appear to be gone from the House but advises students to take certain precautions to prevent similar infestations in the future.

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Students express concern over proposed changes to Title IX

On Tuesday, six students sat in the Pickering Room of Hubbard Hall with Benje Douglas, director of gender violence prevention and education, to discuss the changes to Title IX put forth by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and to voice concerns about how these changes could affect college campuses like Bowdoin.

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‘Dawnland’ confronts brutality toward Wabanaki

Bowdoin College sits on stolen land. The area campus occupies today was once part of the Wabanaki Confederacy and was integral to the cultural identity and survival of a network of indigenous tribes. When Europeans colonists arrived, they embarked on a program of erasure and cultural genocide that continues today.

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Bowdoin senior challenges Georgia election

The day after the midterm elections, Arah Kang ’19 received a call from the director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAAJ), a national organization that advocates for civil and human rights for Asian Americans. Three hours later, Kang found herself boarding a flight to Atlanta, emailing professors to let them know that she would not be able to make class.

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Define American shines a light on immigration

When Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas came to Bowdoin to speak about his experience as an undocumented immigrant last year, his words hit particularly close to home for Kathleen Armenta ’21. Armenta, the daughter of immigrant parents, said that she was fortunate to attend Vargas’ event and talk to him about her own ambitions of advocating for immigrants and defining American identity.

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College launches new plan to attract veteran students

Although Bowdoin announced a new initiative to enroll military veterans last week, the strategy the College will employ to integrate these non-traditional students into campus life once they are admitted, remains to be seen. With the absence of a Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at Bowdoin, this is a surprising development for the College.

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Dean of Student Affairs Tim Foster to leave the College

Dean of Student Affairs Tim Foster will be leaving Bowdoin at the end of this academic year, citing a desire to spend more time with his family before figuring out his next plans. In an email to the student body announcing Foster’s departure on Monday, President Clayton Rose noted the dean’s “profound impact” on the College and said he has already begun a national search to fill Foster’s role.

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Library acquires 6000 DVDs from Bart & Greg’s

When Bart & Greg’s DVD Explosion, a DVD rental in downtown Brunswick opened by Bart D’Alauro ’95, closed at the end of 2017, D’Alauro’s beloved collection had nowhere to go. Recently, the College announced a plan to purchase 6,000 DVDs from the collection.

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BSG votes on amendments to bylaws, social code revisions

Among the issues Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) members discussed Wednesday at their weekly meeting were amendments to the bylaws and potential revisions to the College’s Social Code. The changes in the bylaws, a motion from Vice President Amber Rock ’19, are intended to match the language of the BSG constitution.

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Test Center eases implementation of accommodations

Students who receive academic accommodations now have a reliable place to take proctored tests. After the Test Center opened this fall, Anne Lamppa, assistant director of student accessibility and test center coordinator, is continuing to adapt the space to work for all students.

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First years lead charge on Native American Heritage Month

Led by two first years, the Native American Student Association (NASA) is recognizing Native American Heritage Month this November with speakers, food and a documentary screening. The group has the twin goals of deepening awareness of Native American issues on campus and building up its own presence after a lull last year due to lack of membership.

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Concerned students denounce anti-trans graffiti

Update Friday, November 9 at 5:28 p.m.: Today at 4:59 p.m., Michael Reed, senior vice president for diversity and inclusion, sent an email to the Bowdoin community on behalf of the Bias Incident Group (BIG) regarding “an anonymous act of defacement and transphobia” that took place in a women’s restroom in David Saul Smith Union.

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Spring 2019 schedule tweaked after feedback

After modifications to the course schedule increasing the time between classes debuted this fall, class times for the spring will see a few small changes in response to student and faculty feedback. The opening of Round I of registration on Monday marked the end of a process that occurs behind the scenes in the months leading up to each semester.

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College unveils first redesign of bowdoin.edu in 13 years

The new Bowdoin website, bowdoin.edu, launched on Tuesday night after undergoing its first major revamp in 13 years. The complete overhaul of the website, which has been in the works for the last three years, went extremely smoothly, said Janie Porche, the director of content for Bowdoin’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs.

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Anti-trans language targets bathroom menstrual products

A sign advertising free menstrual products in the bathroom on the first floor of David Saul Smith Union was defaced with trans-exclusionary language this week. In an email to the Orient, Director of Gender Violence Prevention and Education Benje Douglas said that the Bias Incident Group (BIG) would be convening next week to discuss the incident but declined to comment further.

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New discussions and programming headline Sexual Respect Week

Bowdoin Healthy Relationships’ (BHeRe) Sexual Respect Week is getting more intimate this year. Yesterday, BHeRe kicked off a week of concentrated programming dedicated to creating discussion and awareness around sexual respect, boundaries and healthy relationships. “The goal of the week is really to get these ideas of sexual respect out there in the open because sometimes it’s a very taboo topic or it’s talked about only in a very restricted context, so hopefully having this week will make sexual respect something more prominent that students think about in their day-to-day lives,” said Monica Xing ’19, a co-leader of BHeRe.

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Studzinski debates highlight differences, turn testy

Candidates for two of Maine’s seats in Congress took to the stage in Studzinski Recital Hall on Tuesday afternoon for two debates preceding the November 6 election. The first debate, for U.S. Senate, featured independent incumbent Angus King and two challengers—Republican Eric Brakey, a current state senator, and Democrat Zak Ringelstein, a former teacher.

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Visiting lecturer contends that the world would be a better place if the #MeToo movement had never happened

Last night, journalist Helen Andrews gave a talk at Bowdoin titled “The New McCarthyism” in which she compared today’s culture of “political correctness” with Joseph McCarthy’s persecution of accused communist sympathizers in the 1950s. Andrews argued that McCarthyism was aimed at “an existential threat” and all accusations were supported by evidence, but said the #MeToo movement has created a similar atmosphere without clearing the same evidentiary hurdle.

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Dr. Amer Ahmed talks intersections, Islamophobia

After a quick introductory breath, Dr. Amer Ahmed kicked off No Hate November with a rap. “I stand poisoned by religion / the decisions of sin / while television spins the lies of white men / I see no friends as the media sends / the myth of the truth to fear my brown skin,” he performed to a surprised audience in Kresge Auditorium last night.

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Student frustration comes through at Town Hall

At today’s Bowdoin Student Government (BSG)-led Town Hall, students expressed frustration about perceived inertia in response to bias incidents—most recently, a swastika that was reported in the Hubbard Hall Stacks at the end of September. In total, four swastikas have been reported on campus in the past two years.

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BSG to hold Town Hall, swastika from 2017 reported

Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) will hold a Town Hall at 4 p.m. today to discuss campus bias incidents in light of swastika graffiti found in the Hubbard Hall stacks last month. “There will be space for students to share honest reactions to this bias incident, and community leaders from both the administration and student body will be present to hear and grapple with these concerns,” wrote Nate DeMoranville ’20, BSG chair of facilities and sustainability, in an email on Monday afternoon on behalf of the BSG Executive Committee.

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BSG meeting addresses Title IX, No Hate November

Title IX Coordinator Benje Douglas came to Bowdoin Student Government’s (BSG) General Assembly meeting on Wednesday night to talk about the culture surrounding sexual harassment and assault on campus and answer questions about the resources available to survivors.

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Alcohol-related summonses issued to eight students

Eight students received court summonses last weekend after several separate off-campus incidents that occurred late Saturday night and shortly after midnight on Sunday. Brunswick Police Department (BPD) issued summonses to two 21-year-old students for allowing a minor to consume liquor and to six students under the age of 21 for possession of alcohol by a minor or consuming liquor.

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BQSA organizes allyship conversation

On Tuesday evening, the Bowdoin Queer-Straight Alliance (BQSA) led a program in Daggett Lounge called “Allyship, A Campus Discussion.” Falling just two days before Yellow Shirt Day during OUTtober—a series of programming BQSA organizes to promote awareness of and allyship around the experiences of members of the Bowdoin community who identify as LGBTQIA+— this discussion brought a renewed level of thoughtfulness to a campus tradition.

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‘Take Back the Night’ to train focus on survivors

Student leaders, Safe Space volunteers, faculty from the Office of Gender Violence Prevention and Education and members of the Sexual Assault Support Services of Midcoast Maine (SASSMM) will all come together at 7:30 p.m. tonight to host the annual “Take Back the Night” event.

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Organizers direct student attention to Maine elections

As midterm season approaches and lawn signs appear, political organizations at Bowdoin have been bringing local candidates to campus to discuss Maine politics. The Bowdoin Republicans, the Maine Democratic Party (MDP) and Bowdoin Democrats are encouraging student involvement in Maine politics due to the potential impact student votes could have on the contentious gubernatorial race.

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What you didn’t know: BQSA launches queer history poster campaign

As part of OUTtober, Bowdoin Queer Straight Alliance (BQSA) launched a new poster initiative: “Queer History You Didn’t Know and History You Didn’t Know was Queer.” The idea arose out of a discussion among BQSA members about how many people, including members of the LGBTQ community, lack an understanding of queer history.

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With Halloween coming up, BSG assembly warns against cultural appropriation

Wednesday night’s BSG meeting focused on the recent bias incident report released by President Clayton Rose and included a discussion on cultural appropriation centered around Halloween costumes. In discussing the Bias Incident Group’s report on the swastika found in the Hubbard Hall stacks, Senior Class President Henry Bredar explained his frustration with the lack of closure after such incidents are reported.

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Swastika etched on desk draws contempt

In an email to the campus community on Tuesday, President Clayton Rose announced that a swastika, drawn on a carrel and accompanied by the phrase “Heil Hitler,” has been deemed a bias incident. It is the third time the Nazi symbol has been found on Bowdoin’s campus since early 2017 and comes amidst an uptick in white nationalist imagery at colleges and universities across the nation.

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In run for governor, Hayes ’80 fights against partisanship

Terry Hayes ’80 says she never planned on running for office. The first time she did, she lost, only to rebound and win six races over the following decade. After eight years in the Maine House of Representatives and nearly four as the State Treasurer, she has identified partisan bickering as the central cause of the state’s problems.

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Town council candidates find common ground

Sande Updegraph and Dan Ankeles are two candidates approaching an at-large Town Council seat in Brunswick—the town’s only contested election at the local level this November. Despite their differing prior experiences, the two have similar opinions on several political issues.

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Counseling introduces confidential, 24-hour phone service

In response to concerns about accessibility of services, particularly outside normal hours, Counseling Services announced its partnership with ProtoCall, a telephonic counseling service available 24 hours a day. The partnership, announced on October 1, is designed to increase the number of counseling services available by providing students the opportunity to receive counseling both after hours and on weekends.

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