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News

Sexual Assault Awareness Month: April and Beyond

For the first time since Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) became nationally recognized in 2001, several student groups collaborated on programming this April. While the month provided students with the opportunity to learn about supporting survivors of sexual assault and align themselves with national movements, organizers say that outreach continues to pose a challenge.

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All SAFC money allocated for this year

As the academic year approaches its end, so, too, does funding for student activities. The Student Activities Funding Committee (SAFC)—responsible for allocating funds to student organizations throughout the year—spent the last of its $700,000 budget on April 1.

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Mishra ’20 outlines goals for BSG presidency

Born in London and having completed middle and high school in Nepal, Ural Mishra ’20 made the decision to attend a college in the United States. Now, he will be its president, after winning the Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) election for the 2019-20 academic year, the results of which were announced Sunday night.

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What John Kasich did (and didn’t) say at Bowdoin

John Kasich wouldn’t say whether he’ll run for president in 2020. However, the former Ohio governor did speak about his disagreements with the Republican Party and fielded what were, at times, confrontational questions from students during an hour-long discussion in Pickard Theater on Monday night.

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Vigil honors victims of Christchurch massacre

At 9 p.m. on Tuesday evening, 50 candles illuminated the steps of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, each representing a victim of the terror attacks at the Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Islamic Center in Christchurch, New Zealand on March 15.

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Oxfam America leader talks poverty and inequality

In a talk aptly named “Inequality and the Injustice of Poverty” on Tuesday night, President and CEO of Oxfam America Abigail Maxman challenged her audience of around three dozen students and professors in Kresge Auditorium to consider the challenge that these two forces pose today.

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Janet Lohmann to become Dean of Student Affairs in July

In an email to the Bowdoin community on Monday morning, President Clayton Rose announced that current Dean of Students Janet Lohmann will serve as Bowdoin’s new Dean of Student Affairs, effective July 1, 2019. Lohmann will replace current Dean of Student Affairs Tim Foster when he steps down at the end of the academic year Rose noted that the College conducted a national search to replace Foster, ultimately interviewing four finalists.

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Countdown to BSG elections: unopposed candidates dominate

On Wednesday, students filled the chairs of Jack Magee’s Pub and Grill to watch the annual Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) election debates. Moderated by the Orient’s editors-in-chief Calder McHugh ’19 and Jessica Piper ’19, the debates gave students the opportunity to get to know the candidates for next year’s BSG executive team and hear their proposed platforms.

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Executive order links free speech to federal funds

On March 21, President Trump signed an executive order which mandated that colleges receiving federal funds must uphold the principles of free speech. While the order has the potential to increase anxieties around what has been a hot-button topic for years, Bowdoin is not concerned.

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Inaugural lecture probes model minority myth

Imagine walking into a bookstore and seeing a bookshelf labeled “Asian History” that includes volumes on Chinese history alongside volumes on Asian-American history. Now imagine a bookshelf labeled “African History” that includes volumes on the history of Nigeria alongside volumes on African Americans in the United States.

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College House verdicts released for Class of 2022

On Monday evening, College House decisions came out. Two hundred sixty students applied to live in the College Houses, an increase from 247 applications for the 2018-2019 academic year. The most popular houses were Quinby House and Boody-Johnson House, which is new this year.

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College plans on new minors in Arabic, Middle East Studies

After years of discussion, faculty and administration are taking final steps to approve the creation of two new minors at the College: Arabic and Middle East and North African Studies. Bowdoin began to permanently offer Arabic courses in 2008 under Lecturer in Arabic Russell Hopley, who remained the single instructor of the language before leaving the College last year.

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Storyteller shares experience growing up Deaf and Jewish

On Tuesday, storyteller Roxanne Baker, an educator and activist, told a crowded room in Moulton Union’s Lancaster Lounge a story from her childhood about coming to terms with both her deafness and her Jewish identity. Baker was born in Portland to a hearing family and until she was eight, attempted to get by with reading lips with the help of intense speech therapy.

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Second dorm fire in five weeks

At around 2:15 a.m. on Monday morning, a lit candle ignited a jacket and a bedspread, activating the smoke alarm in Baxter House. A student in the room extinguished the fire, resulting in a minor hand injury.

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Events

‘Under Fire’ in a ‘more perfect union’: April Ryan talks White House reporting

When she took to the stage in Kresge Auditorium on Tuesday night, April Ryan faced a nicer crowd than she’s encountered at the White House lately. In front of a packed audience of students and community members in Kresge Auditorium, Ryan spoke about her experience covering the White House and the long quest for a “more perfect union.” The event, sponsored by the African-American Society, was the the final program of Black History Month and Beyond and the first of Herstory, a celebration of Women’s History Month.

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BSG votes to adopt student-created voting software

On Wednesday, Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) representatives deliberated and voted on a new voting system. Out of the three choices—a student-created, computer-based system, paper ballots and software purchased from an external provider—the majority voted for buying student-created software.

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Bowdoin women of color collaborate on annual photoshoot and gallery

Last night, the exhibition “Beauty in Color” opened in the Lamarche Gallery in David Saul Smith Union. It featured photos that were taken on February 3 during Bowdoin’s second annual Women of Color Photoshoot, where 40 Bowdoin women of color (WOC), three organizers and general photographers gathered in room 601 of Memorial Hall.

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Bowdoin alum talks ‘hacking literature’

Weaving together literature, biotechnology, philosophy and political theory, Eileen Hunt Botting ’93 took to the podium in the Searles Science Building on Monday evening to deliver her lecture “Shelley, Hawthorne, and the Ethics of Genetic Engineering.” Addressing Bowdoin students, professors and community members in a packed lecture hall, Botting explored the ethical and political implications of advancements in biotechnology through a discussion of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein,” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Birth-Mark” and other works she calls “hacker literature” in a talk sponsored by the Peucinian Society.

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BCA thinks big picture with Sunrise alliance

For its next foray into climate activism, Bowdoin Climate Action (BCA)  is connecting with the Sunrise Movement, a national organization that advocates for political action on climate change. Sunrise has mostly recently been linked to activism surrounding the Green New Deal—not divestment campaigns, for which BCA had long been known.

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Brock Clarke delivers Greason inaugural lecture

Last night, Bowdoin students, faculty and community members huddled together in Kresge Auditorium to listen to Professor of English Brock Clarke’s inaugural lecture as the A. Leroy Greason Professor of English. Clarke’s talk, titled “What the Cold Can Teach Us,” focused less on inclement weather itself but instead on Clarke’s own experiences and obsessions and their influence on him as a writer.

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BSG votes to buy condoms and dental dams for upperclass residences

In an almost-unanimous vote, Bowdoin Student Government’s (BSG) General Assembly voted to purchase $500 worth of condoms and dental dams for upperclassmen housing. The initiative, which was introduced for the second year in a row, was proposed by Tessa DeFranco ’21 to address a lack of access to contraceptives and sexual protection in many residential areas.

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Fire causes more than $10,000 in damage

Students were evacuated from Quinby House Monday morning after a fire broke out in a student bedroom. Tristan Young ’21, the resident of the room, was taken to the Maine Medical Center for treatment for second- and third-degree burns on his right hand, but has since been released.

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Career Planning refocuses on practical skills, internships

Helping students develop practical skills is the focus of the newest initiative from the Career Planning Center (CPC). The renewed push comes on the heels of a report released by President Clayton Rose last fall, which found that students felt they lacked important professional skills such as personal finance and public speaking.

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Oren Cass addresses the future of the economy

What if the dominant paradigm of economic thinking in the United States is wrong? On Tuesday evening, in his talk titled “The Once and Future Worker: How Consumerist Consensus Led America Astray and How to Recover,” Oren Cass, senior fellow for policy research at the Manhattan Institute, outlined his vision for an economy that would take into account the interests of workers.

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Affinity groups band together for Blind Date Dinner

Last night, African American Society (AfAm), Latin American Student Organization (LASO) and Asian Student Alliance (ASA) joined together to put on the third annual Valentine’s Day Blind Date Dinner. The central goal of the program was to bring as many people together—breaking outside of their own Bowdoin bubbles—as possible, said Louis Mendez ’19, president of LASO.

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Inaugural lecture discusses steadying institutions through times of turmoil

Bowdoin students and community members gathered in Kresge on Monday for Professor Allen Springer’s inaugural lecture as the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Constitutional and International Law and Government. Speaking to a rapt audience, Springer stressed the importance of valuing international laws and institutions in his lecture, titled “Institutional Resilience in Turbulent Times.” “The question of how international institutions evolve, even survive in a changing world seems particularly relevant today,” Springer said in the opening of his lecture.

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Bowdoin among top Fulbright producers, again

Bowdoin was again lauded as one of the top Fulbright-producing institutions for the 2018-2019 academic year, with 19 students receiving Fulbright Student grants. Among Bachelor’s institutions, only Williams had more awardees, with 22. Thirty-seven Bowdoin students had applied for Fulbright awards, yielding a 51 percent success rate.

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Annual winter flu outbreak sweeps across Bowdoin’s campus

Over the last few weeks, providers at Health Services have treated hundreds of students with flu-like symptoms. This noticeable uptick in flu cases would be unusual at most other points in the academic year, but according to Jeffrey Maher, director of health services, an increase in flu cases immediately after Winter Break is an annual occurrence.

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First-gen alumnus elected trustee chair

Robert F. White ’77 P’15 has been elected unanimously to serve as the chair of Bowdoin’s Board of Trustees. His term will begin on July 1, 2019. White succeeds Michele G. Cyr ’76 P’12 who served as chair for three years and will continue to serve on the Board.

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Women’s stories take center stage

Stories of friendship, trauma and political activism share the stage this weekend at the third annual production of “RISE: Untold Stories of Bowdoin Women.” This year’s show, true to its roots, represents diverse experiences of Bowdoin women, even when they may be difficult to hear.

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Five decades of the environment at Bowdoin

In April of last year, the College announced its achievement of carbon neutrality, two years ahead of schedule. The notice came after a decade of infrastructural overhauls—a cogenerations turbine, oil to natural gas conversion, the installation of thousands of LED lights and, finally, the purchase of renewable energy credits.

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Lecturer analyzes premodern reproductive health

On Monday afternoon, Leslie Tuttle, associate professor of history from Louisiana State University, began a talk to a packed audience in the Beam Classroom by describing the “suspicious death” of Mademoiselle de Guerchy, a tabloid star of Louis XIV’s Paris.

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Disparities exist in CPC programming

The Orient’s midyear approval ratings showed that the senior class is overwhelmingly dissatisfied with the Career Planning Center (CPC)—but further investigation has shown that approval varies widely by industry, with students looking to enter consulting and technology generally expressing positive sentiments while students in arts and communications are the least happy.

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Political donations from faculty and staff increase, stay left in midterm cycle

Political donations by Bowdoin faculty and staff surged during the 2018 midterm cycle and universally supported liberal causes, according to an Orient analysis of data from the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). Donations made by members of the College’s Board of Trustees were varied between Democratic and Republican groups and candidates, but donations to liberal causes far outnumbered donations to conservative causes.

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Bowdoin kicks off Black History Month and Beyond

A Pulitzer Prize winning author and a White House correspondent will be among the guests on campus for Black History Month and Beyond this year. The celebration, led by several affinity groups, will officially commence today during the Kick-Off Reception in Russwurm African American Center from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

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BSG seeks input on double minors, exam policy

Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) sent out a survey to gauge student opinion of two widely-contested academic policies last week with the hopes of garnering momentum to convince faculty to change the policies. The first of these policies, known as the “bunching rule,” states that students with three final exams in a 48-hour period can reschedule one to a more convenient time; the second policy prevents students from declaring two minors.

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Partial government shutdown affects science research

As the government shutdown drags on for more than a month, it has begun to affect scientific research on campus, already forcing some faculty and students to adjust their plans. “The shutdown has definitely affected my ability to do collaborative projects,” said Patsy Dickinson, Josiah Little professor of natural sciences.

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Jonathan R. Farmer ’03 among Americans killed in Syria

Bowdoin graduate and U.S. Army Green Beret Jonathan R. Farmer ’03 was killed in action in Syria on January 16 along with three other Americans. He was 37 years old. The Islamic State took credit for the attack in the northern city of Manbij, which killed 19 people in total after a suicide bomber detonated an explosive vest inside a restaurant.

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College offers first annual MLK day programming

For the first time when the holiday fell during the semester, the College did not hold classes on Martin Luther King Day. In lieu of beginning the semester on Monday, students were encouraged to participate in programming that focused on the life and legacy of Dr.

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Midyear approval ratings

This past week, the Orient sent out its semesterly approval ratings survey. The survey was sent to all 1,805 students and yielded 475 responses (26.3 percent). Support for the Brunswick Police Department declined sharply from last year amid controversy over off-campus enforcement.

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First year dies in car crash

Henry Zietlow ’22, from St. Paul, Minnesota, died in a car crash in Wisconsin on Monday. According to a release from the Wisconsin State Patrol, Zietlow and his mother were headed north on Highway 63 near the town of Hayward when a southbound pickup truck lost control and crossed into the northbound lane, where it collided with their car.

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Politics becomes personal as students advocate for climate change policy in D.C.

Politics doesn’t always happen during an optimal time—a lesson Bowdoin students learned last Sunday as they headed to Washington D.C., two days before finals period began. Sixteen students joined 1,000 protesters in the nation’s capitol this weekend to sit-in and encourage House Representatives to support a resolution for a Select Committee for a Green New Deal proposed by newly elected U.S.

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Flying squirrels take up residence

The Northern flying squirrel can glide 135 feet through the air—and a few of these furry mammals have landed in Quinby House this fall. Jeff Tuttle, senior associate director for facilities operations and maintenance, says the squirrels appear to be gone from the House but advises students to take certain precautions to prevent similar infestations in the future.

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Students express concern over proposed changes to Title IX

On Tuesday, six students sat in the Pickering Room of Hubbard Hall with Benje Douglas, director of gender violence prevention and education, to discuss the changes to Title IX put forth by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and to voice concerns about how these changes could affect college campuses like Bowdoin.

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‘Dawnland’ confronts brutality toward Wabanaki

Bowdoin College sits on stolen land. The area campus occupies today was once part of the Wabanaki Confederacy and was integral to the cultural identity and survival of a network of indigenous tribes. When Europeans colonists arrived, they embarked on a program of erasure and cultural genocide that continues today.

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Bowdoin senior challenges Georgia election

The day after the midterm elections, Arah Kang ’19 received a call from the director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAAJ), a national organization that advocates for civil and human rights for Asian Americans. Three hours later, Kang found herself boarding a flight to Atlanta, emailing professors to let them know that she would not be able to make class.

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Define American shines a light on immigration

When Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas came to Bowdoin to speak about his experience as an undocumented immigrant last year, his words hit particularly close to home for Kathleen Armenta ’21. Armenta, the daughter of immigrant parents, said that she was fortunate to attend Vargas’ event and talk to him about her own ambitions of advocating for immigrants and defining American identity.

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College launches new plan to attract veteran students

Although Bowdoin announced a new initiative to enroll military veterans last week, the strategy the College will employ to integrate these non-traditional students into campus life once they are admitted, remains to be seen. With the absence of a Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) at Bowdoin, this is a surprising development for the College.

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Dean of Student Affairs Tim Foster to leave the College

Dean of Student Affairs Tim Foster will be leaving Bowdoin at the end of this academic year, citing a desire to spend more time with his family before figuring out his next plans. In an email to the student body announcing Foster’s departure on Monday, President Clayton Rose noted the dean’s “profound impact” on the College and said he has already begun a national search to fill Foster’s role.

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Library acquires 6000 DVDs from Bart & Greg’s

When Bart & Greg’s DVD Explosion, a DVD rental in downtown Brunswick opened by Bart D’Alauro ’95, closed at the end of 2017, D’Alauro’s beloved collection had nowhere to go. Recently, the College announced a plan to purchase 6,000 DVDs from the collection.

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BSG votes on amendments to bylaws, social code revisions

Among the issues Bowdoin Student Government (BSG) members discussed Wednesday at their weekly meeting were amendments to the bylaws and potential revisions to the College’s Social Code. The changes in the bylaws, a motion from Vice President Amber Rock ’19, are intended to match the language of the BSG constitution.

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Test Center eases implementation of accommodations

Students who receive academic accommodations now have a reliable place to take proctored tests. After the Test Center opened this fall, Anne Lamppa, assistant director of student accessibility and test center coordinator, is continuing to adapt the space to work for all students.

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First years lead charge on Native American Heritage Month

Led by two first years, the Native American Student Association (NASA) is recognizing Native American Heritage Month this November with speakers, food and a documentary screening. The group has the twin goals of deepening awareness of Native American issues on campus and building up its own presence after a lull last year due to lack of membership.

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Concerned students denounce anti-trans graffiti

Update Friday, November 9 at 5:28 p.m.: Today at 4:59 p.m., Michael Reed, senior vice president for diversity and inclusion, sent an email to the Bowdoin community on behalf of the Bias Incident Group (BIG) regarding “an anonymous act of defacement and transphobia” that took place in a women’s restroom in David Saul Smith Union.

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